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Environment Magazine September/October 2008

 

January-February 2018

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Corrigendum

In Volume 57, Issue 3 of Environment, Table 1 in the article “The Sustainability Challenges of Our Meat and Dairy Diets” contained an incorrect piece of data. The corrected table and accompanying paragraph are printed below. The authors apologize for this oversight.

Corrected version of Table 1 in Stoll-Kleemann, S., O'Riordan, T. (2015). The sustainability challenges of our meat and dairy diets. Environment 57(3): 34–48. doi: 10.1080/00139157.2015.1025644.

Corrected Table 1:  Food Production GHG Emissions (Source: Tilman and Clark 2014)

Food typesg CO2eq/kcalg CO2eq /g-protein
Ruminant meat5.662
Recirc. Aqua4.430
Pork1.610
Poultry1.310
Vegetables0.68n/a
Eggs0.596.8
Dairy0.529.1
Butter0.33n/a
Rice0.146.5
Tropical fruits0.14n/a
Temperate fruits0.10n/a
Wheat0.061.2
Oil crops0.05n/a
Maize0.031.2
Legumes0.020.25

Corrected paragraph on page 39

Beef and dairy products are very emissions-intensive livestock products responsible for the most emissions, accounting for 65% of the total GHGs emitted by livestock.10 Average global estimates suggest that, per unit of protein, GHG emissions from beef production are around 150 times those of soy products, by volume, and even the least emissions-intensive meat products — pork and chicken — produce 65–80 times more GHGs than plant-based foods (see Table 1).17

 

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